Local Heritage


Pitlochry Heritage

The name Pitlochry comes from the Gaelic "Pit CLoich Aire" meaning place of the "Sentinel Stone".  The area around the town is rich in standing stones, stone circles and ancient sites.

Pitlochry sits below Ben Vrackie (the speckled mountain), beside the River Tummel, in some of the most magnificent scenery in Scotland.

With its backdrop of surrounding hills, beautiful woodlands and rivers, it is wonderful walking country, particulary stunning in Autumn.

It was originally three small mediaeval hamlets, Moulin on the High Drive, Port na Craig by the river with its Ferry Boat and Pitlochry.  In the 1700's General Wade's Military Road increased early travellers and coaching inns were built, but the coming of the Highland Railway in 1863 put Pitlochry within reach of Victorian and Edwardian visitors.  Queen Victoria's visits to Highland Perthshire in search of clean air and relaxtion put the area firmly on the tourist circuit.

The town has many examples of Victorian architecture and the town centre is a Conservation area. Andrew Heiton's beautiful "Athole Hydropathic", Pitlochry Festival Theatre, iconic on the riverbank and two charming whisky distilleries charm visitors.  The area is renowned as "Big Tree Country" and it abounds with waterfalls, forest walks and wildlife.

Pitlochry in Bloom is pleased to be working on a new Town Heritage Trail and Tourist map over the winter of 2013/14.  This is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) and is centred on the Station, which is 150 years old in 2013.

 

 

 

 

The Hamlet of Port na Craig

 

 


Pitlochry in Bloom

Station Porter

The most recent of Morag's sculptures, complete with luggage trolley, was placed at the station in 2003.

Pitlochry in Bloom

The Fisherman

Commissioned in 2004, the fisherman now has a boat which was made for him in 2004 and is found on the south side of the railway bridge as you head into Pitlochry from the South.

Pitlochry in Bloom

Flower Seller

Victorian Flower Seller - another of Morag's commissions for the Bloom in 1996, she orginally sat in the small garden opposite the Bank of Scotland, she moved to her present site between the Bank of Scotland and RBS in 2003.